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File #: 2018-4732 (15 minutes)   
Type: Regular Agenda Item
Body: City Council
On agenda: 1/16/2018
Title: Recommendation to Accept Report on Interim Inspection, Testing, Preliminary Analyses and Reporting Services for Rehabilitation of Piers 1, 2, and 3 at Alameda Point. (Base Reuse 819099)
Attachments: 1. Exhibit 1 - Presentation, 2. Exhibit 2 - Interim Report

Title

 

Recommendation to Accept Report on Interim Inspection, Testing, Preliminary Analyses and Reporting Services for Rehabilitation of Piers 1, 2, and 3 at Alameda Point. (Base Reuse 819099) 

 

Body

 

To: Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council

 

From: Jill Keimach, City Manager

 

Re: Recommendation to Accept Report on Interim Inspection, Testing, Preliminary Analyses and Reporting Services for Rehabilitation of Piers 1, 2, and 3 at Alameda Point

 

BACKGROUND

 

At the July 19, 2016 City Council meeting, the Council approved a contract to commission a study on the condition of the Alameda Point piers.  The engineering firm of Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) was engaged to perform the scope of services associated with the report.  The report provides a summary of the field inspection, engineering investigations, preliminary analyses, and assessments of Alameda Point piers.  The work was intended to ensure the adequacy of the piers for permanently mooring the U.S Department of Transportation Maritime Administration (MARAD) fleet.  The engineering assessment is intended to identify any issues pertaining to the structural capacity of the piers and mooring system and to assist the City in infrastructure planning and developing budgeting priorities.  While the larger ships in the MARAD fleet are relocating because of increasing dredging costs, the five (5) smaller ships remain at the Alameda Point pier. 

The report measures the pier condition according to the MARAD standards (technical requirements).  The technical requirements are generic enough to be applicable to any industrial maritime user, therefore the results of the study are not limited to a MARAD use only.  In fact, MARAD has a diverse fleet, so the analysis is useful for understanding the general condition of the pier for any user.

The full report is very detailed and is provided for your information (Exhibit 2).  Overall, the Alameda Point piers have experienced chemical intrusion that has compromised the structures, but there are many different ways to address the problem.  This staff report and presentation provide a high level discussion proving we have the essential information needed to guide our planning and full utilization of the piers for any potential tenant. 

DISCUSSION

 

This discussion section outlines the PowerPoint presentation.  It details the process of data collection and lists accompanying results.  When the City knows who will be using the piers long term, staff can develop a repair and financing plan for City Council review.   

 

The Process:  The process of assessing the condition of the pier included:

                     Above and below water inspection of Piers 1, 2, and 3;

                     Material tests gathered from select locations within the project;

                     Geotechnical investigation of Piers 1, 2 and 3 for purposes of structural assessment;

                     Preliminary analysis of Piers 1,2, and 3 which includes mooring and structural assessment; and

                     Repair and replacement recommendations for applicable pier.

 

The Results:

Overall, for their age, the investment, and current use, the Alameda Point piers are in good condition.  Pier 2, which is the most used of the piers and MARAD’s desired location, is the most compromised and requires the most investment.  The current lease with MARAD gives the City the flexibility to make location decisions for the MARAD ships.  Both the location of the MARAD ships and the level of investment/next steps will depend upon the ultimate end users of the piers.  At the time of the study, MARAD had not decided to remove its large ships from Alameda.  Therefore the report makes findings regarding the mooring hardware for large vessels, which is no longer applicable. 

 

                     Pier 1 is generally in satisfactory condition to meet the MARAD lease requirements.  The current mooring hardware on the pier does not meet the structural design requirement for the mooring of a larger ship in the MARAD fleet, at the pier during a 100-year storm, although it is capable of supporting mooring loads under less demanding conditions. The pier is capable of withstanding the required deck loads required under the lease. 

 

Maintenance of the king piles, cleaning and new coating is recommended to retain the capacity and durability of the pier for future operations.  SGH recommends that the pier be inspected on a five-year interval and be re-evaluated at that time.

 

                     Pier 2 has certain areas that are not capable of meeting MARAD lease requirements due to concrete pile deterioration.  Repair or replacement of piles will be necessary for continue operations of the pier for MARAD.  Like Pier 1, the current mooring hardware on the pier does not meet the structural design requirement for the mooring of the MARAD vessels during a 100-year storm, although it is capable of supporting mooring loads under less demanding conditions. 

 

SGH recommends the damaged region of the pier be inspected every two years until maintenance has been provided.  Upon completion of repair or replacement, the pier can be elevated to a satisfactory rating and be inspected on a five-year interval.

 

                     Pier 3 is in satisfactory condition.  The current mooring hardware on the pier does not meet the structural design requirement for the mooring at the pier during a 100-year storm, although it is capable of supporting mooring loads under less demanding conditions.  The pier is capable of withstanding the required deck loads from the MARAD lease.  Slight pile deterioration was noted, but it does not structurally compromise the overall structural capacity for the operational loads.

 

The piers are designed for naval operations, a more intensive use than they are currently being used for by MARAD.  However, due to chemical corrosion and deterioration, Pier 2 needs significant investment to ensure its structural integrity.  Depending upon what the long term uses are for the piers,  SGH has developed a range of repair options spanning from repairing 60 piles to 339 and ranging in cost from $2.4 million  to $13.0 million, respectively.  Implementation of the identified options will be driven by the needs of long-term end users.

An alternative to repairing the existing piles is to replace the piles completely with new piles strategically located.  This option would include opening the deck near the existing pile cap, driving a new pile, then tying the new pile into the existing pile cap.  Replacing piles is ideal when the bent is severely damaged and requires complete restoration such is the case at Pier 2.  Replacement of piles will restore the pier to its original capacity and is estimated to cost $9.9 million. 

 

In determining next steps, the City will use the report and its cost estimates in conjunction with other infrastructure estimates and priorities at Alameda Point to develop a path forward.  The Alameda Point piers were not included in the Master Infrastructure Plan.  Financing upgrades to the piers and their accompanying utility systems will need to be funded by a separate strategy.

 

Staff is actively marketing the Alameda Point piers.  The goals are to find a tenant that replaces revenue lost by the removal of the large MARAD ships; create jobs that contribute to Alameda’s working waterfront; and attract the tenant whose revenue/job generation exceeds the investment needed to extend the life and usefulness of this valuable Alameda port. 

In general, the Alameda Point Piers are in a condition that reflects the age of the facility.  The future intended uses will dictate whether the City will choose the repair or replace option for extending the life of the piers.  Proper maintenance of the piers should be considered and implemented to prolong the integrity and durability of the structures for future uses. 

 

Upon full leasing of the piers, staff will: 

 

1.                     Work with an engineering team to determine the level of repairs necessary to support operations.

2.                     Develop and propose a financing strategy for the repairs.

3.                     Implement and budget for a long term maintenance program. 

 

FINANCIAL IMPACT

 

There is no financial impact at this time.   As stated above, the future intended uses will dictate whether the City will choose the repair or replace option for extending the life of the piers and these options could range from $2.4 million to $13.0 million. 

MUNICIPAL CODE/POLICY DOCUMENT CROSS REFERENCE

This action is in compliance with the Alameda Municipal Code.

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW

This action is not a “project” under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), as it does not have the potential for resulting in either a direct physical change in the environment or a reasonably foreseeable indirect physical change in the environment.  No further environmental review is required.

RECOMMENDATION

 

This is for information only.  Once the long term tenancy of the piers is better determined, staff will present a pier infrastructure repair and financing strategy to the City Council. 

Respectfully submitted,

Jennifer Ott, Base Reuse & Transportation Planning Director

By:

Nanette Mocanu, Assistant Community Development Director

 

Financial impact section reviewed,

Edwin L. Gato, Acting Finance Director

 

Exhibits:

1.                     PowerPoint Presentation

2.                     Report On Interim Inspection, Testing, and Analysis of Alameda Piers 1, 2, and 3 at Alameda Point